Integrating the Humanities into Antarctic Studies

“Integrating the Humanities into Antarctic Studies”

This project, run by Assoc. Professor Elizabeth Leane at the University of Tasmania, seeks to create a rounded understanding of the Antarctic by integrating the humanities into what is currently a science-dominated research area.

Antarctica may be geographically at the margins of our world, but it is at the centre of pressing contemporary issues. Not only do the continent’s ice, oceans and atmosphere have a pivotal physical role in global climate, its spectacular icescape has a key symbolic role within the popular imagination as the Earth’s most remote and largest wilderness. Antarctica has scientific meaning, but it also has cultural, political, social and historical meaning. While it is crucial that we continue to develop scientific knowledge of the continent, Australian and international research needs to go beyond this. Supported by an Australian Research Council Future Fellowship, this project aims to create a rounded understanding of the Antarctic by integrating the humanities into what is currently a science-dominated research area. Through our separate research projects and our facilitation of scholarly events and exchanges, we hope to foster disciplinary dialogue around the Antarctic, expanding our capacity to meet complex challenges facing the region, including climate change, tourism and national interests. The project is led by Assoc. Prof. Elizabeth Leane, with team members including PhD candidates Hanne Nielsen and Miranda Nieboer. We are based at the University of Tasmania, where we split our time between the School of Humanities and the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies.